Kickstarter campaigns aren’t all inspirational success stories. For every project that comes to fruition to the satisfaction of their backers, there are many painful examples of how flawed the system is.

Unfortunately the team at 2Awesome Studio learned that all too well.

One month ago, developers David Jimenez and Alejandro Santiago launched the campaign for Dimension Drive, a comic book inspired sci-fi shooter. With a goal of €30,000, the project looked as if it was on track to meet its goal (if only slightly).

Fast forward to today, where just minutes before the deadline, the final amount of money needed to clear the goal is donated. With the campaign officially over, Dimension Drive was reported to be funded at 100.7% of the goal, resulting in celebration by the developers as well as those following the project. An underdog victory if there ever was one.

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Celebration only lasting a moment, as unfortunate news appeared on 2Awesome’s Twitter account just moments later. Kickstarter informed the team that a €7,000 pledge had been reported fraudulent, and that unfortunately it will result in the campaign being closed as a failure, with all funds being returned to backers.

There are currently no further details on the fraudulent donation at this moment, and 2Awesome is currently attempting to find a possible solution. We’ve reached out to both parties involved for comment, and will update as information becomes available.

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This unfortunate story is eye-opening in terms of the fragility of these methods of game funding, and goes to show that the process is still very new and full of devastating potential outcomes.

Source: 2Awesome Studio Twitter

  • I’ve always wondered myself how these goal driven fundraising campaigns work in relation to fraud. It all seems so silly and arbitrary. Patreon has the right model.

    Of course there will be fraud but it seems almost weirder to police the fraud than to just let it exist or better yet, change the fundraising model.